PRESS RELEASE 21 September 2017 The Governing Council of the European Central Bank (ECB) decided to develop a euro unsecured overnight interest rate based on data already available to the Eurosystem. The interest rate, which would be produced before 2020, would complement existing benchmark rates produced by the private sector and serve as a backstop…
Ladies and Gentlemen, Let me also welcome you on behalf of the Executive Board to the ECB Legal Conference 2017. Today and tomorrow we will discuss matters that are relevant not just to the ECB and the legal community, but also to the public. The legal order indeed has a direct impact on all our…
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The Securities and Exchange Commission today announced two new initiatives that will build on its Enforcement Division’s ongoing efforts to address cyber-based threats and protect retail investors. The creation of a Cyber Unit that will focus on targeting cyber-related misconduct and the establishment of a retail strategy task force that will implement initiatives that directly affect retail investors reflect SEC Chairman Jay Clayton’s priorities in these important areas.

Cyber Unit

The Cyber Unit will focus the Enforcement Division’s substantial cyber-related expertise on targeting cyber-related misconduct, such as:

  • Market manipulation schemes involving false information spread through electronic and social media
  • Hacking to obtain material nonpublic information
  • Violations involving distributed ledger technology and initial coin offerings
  • Misconduct perpetrated using the dark web
  • Intrusions into retail brokerage accounts
  • Cyber-related threats to trading platforms and other critical market infrastructure

The unit, which has been in the planning stages for months, complements the Chairman’s initiatives to implement an internal cybersecurity risk profile and create a cybersecurity working group to coordinate information sharing, risk monitoring, and incident response efforts throughout the agency.

“Cyber-related threats and misconduct are among the greatest risks facing investors and the securities industry,” said Stephanie Avakian, Co-Director of the SEC’s Enforcement Division.  “The Cyber Unit will enhance our ability to detect and investigate cyber threats through increasing expertise in an area of critical national importance.”

Over the past several years, the Enforcement Division has developed substantial expertise in the detection and pursuit of fraudulent conduct in an increasingly technological and data-driven landscape.  The Cyber Unit will consolidate and advance these efforts, and include staff from across the Enforcement Division.

Robert A. Cohen has been appointed Chief of the Cyber Unit.  Since 2015, he and Joseph Sansone have been Co-Chiefs of the Market Abuse Unit.  Mr. Sansone will continue to lead the Market Abuse Unit as its Chief.

Retail Strategy Task Force

The Retail Strategy Task Force will develop proactive, targeted initiatives to identify misconduct impacting retail investors.  The Enforcement Division has a long and successful history of bringing cases involving fraud targeting retail investors, from everything involving the sale of unsuitable structured products to microcap pump-and-dump schemes. 

This task force will apply the lessons learned from those cases and leverage data analytics and technology to identify large-scale misconduct affecting retail investors.  The task force will include enforcement personnel from around the country and will work with staff across the SEC, including from the SEC’s National Exam Program and the Office of Investor Education and Advocacy.

“Protecting the welfare of the Main Street investor has long been a priority for the Commission,” said Steven Peikin, Co-Director of the SEC’s Enforcement Division.  “By dedicating additional resources and expertise to developing strategies to address misconduct that victimizes retail investors, the division will better protect our most vulnerable market participants.”

Statement from Chairman Clayton

“When Stephanie and Steve approached me with these initiatives, I endorsed them wholeheartedly.  They reflect the division’s continual efforts to pursue new forms of misconduct while keeping a watchful eye out for our Main Street investors,” said SEC Chairman Jay Clayton.

Aaron Rosenbaum, Garth Baughman, Mark Manuszak, Kylie Stewart, Fumiko Hayashi, and Joanna Stavins | The U.S. payments industry is in the process of developing ubiquitous, safe, faster electronic solutions for making a broad variety of business and pers...

The Securities and Exchange Commission today charged a stock market analyst with insider trading prior to the publication of research reports and articles he authored with the false disclaimer that he wasn’t trading in the companies being covered.  He agreed to settle the charges and be barred from trading in penny stocks for the rest of his life.

The SEC alleges that Jason Napodano, who headed a division called Zacks Small Cap Research within a larger investment research firm, misled investors in penny stocks by representing that he wasn’t trading or holding positions in the companies he was writing about while secretly trading the same stocks based on nonpublic information about the publication date of his research.  In an effort to evade detection, Napodano allegedly limited his profits from each illegal trade by taking small positions and closing the positions shortly after his reports and articles were published.

In addition to a permanent penny stock bar, Napodano agreed to pay full disgorgement of his insider trading profits totaling $143,865.48 plus interest of $17,620.87 and a penalty of $143,865.48.  The settlement is subject to court approval.

“Retail investors seek honest rather than conflicted research to help them make decisions about which stocks to buy and trade.  It is unacceptable for analysts to represent they have no stake in the companies they’re writing about while secretly cashing in on trades in those stocks,” said Steven Peikin, Co-Director of the SEC’s Enforcement Division.

The SEC’s complaint also charges a pair of investment bankers who, along with Napodano, allegedly traded on nonpublic information that they and Napodano shared about certain small-cap issuers.  According to the SEC’s complaint, Bilal Basrai and Bryce Stirton worked at Chicago-based brokerage firm LBMZ Securities and together with Napodano breached the duties of trust and confidentiality owed to microcap issuers that retained Zacks Small Cap Research to provide sponsored research or LBMZ to act as a financial adviser.

Basrai agreed to settle the charges by paying disgorgement of his insider trading profits of $39,668.37 plus interest of $4,617.89 and a penalty of $39,668.37.  Stirton agreed to settle the charges without admitting or denying the allegations by paying disgorgement of his insider trading profits totaling $2,218.87 plus interest of $257.43 and a penalty of $2,218.87.  Basrai and Stirton also agreed to be barred from trading penny stocks and from working in the securities industry, with Stirton having the right to reapply after five years. 

In a parallel action, the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of Illinois today announced criminal charges against Napodano and Basrai.

LBMZ Securities separately agreed to be censured and pay a $240,000 penalty without admitting or denying the SEC’s findings that the firm failed to enforce policies and procedures designed to prevent its employees from misusing nonpublic information.  According to the SEC’s order, LBMZ failed to obtain or review complete trading records of many employees, including Basrai, and conducted only a minimal review of employee communications to monitor potential misuse.

The SEC’s investigation was conducted by Jonathan Austin, Elizabeth Doisy, Martin Zerwitz, and Deborah A. Tarasevich and supervised by Robert Cohen and Antonia Chion.  The SEC appreciates the assistance of the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of Illinois, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority.

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The Securities and Exchange Commission today charged a businessman and two companies with defrauding investors in a pair of so-called initial coin offerings (ICOs) purportedly backed by investments in real estate and diamonds.

The SEC alleges that Maksim Zaslavskiy and his companies have been selling unregistered securities, and the digital tokens or coins being peddled don't really exist. According to the SEC's complaint, investors in REcoin Group Foundation and DRC World (also known as Diamond Reserve Club) have been told they can expect sizeable returns from the companies' operations when neither has any real operations.

Zaslavskiy allegedly touted REcoin as "The First Ever Cryptocurrency Backed by Real Estate."  Alleged misstatements to REcoin investors included that the company had a "team of lawyers, professionals, brokers, and accountants" that would invest REcoin's ICO proceeds into real estate when in fact none had been hired or even consulted. Zaslavskiy and REcoin allegedly misrepresented they had raised between $2 million and $4 million from investors when the actual amount is approximately $300,000.

According to the SEC's complaint, Zaslavskiy carried his scheme over to Diamond Reserve Club, which purportedly invests in diamonds and obtains discounts with product retailers for individuals who purchase "memberships" in the company. Despite their representations to investors, the SEC alleges that Zaslavskiy and Diamond have not purchased any diamonds nor engaged in any business operations. Yet they allegedly continue to solicit investors and raise funds as though they have.

The SEC obtained an emergency court order to freeze the assets of Zaslavskiy and his companies.

The SEC's Office of Investor Education and Advocacy recently issued an investor alert warning about the risks of ICOs.

"Investors should be wary of companies touting ICOs as a way to generate outsized returns," said Andrew M. Calamari, Director of the SEC’s New York Regional Office. "As alleged in our complaint, Zaslavskiy lured investors with false promises of sizeable returns from novel technology."

The SEC's complaint, filed in federal district court in Brooklyn, N.Y., charges Zaslavskiy, REcoin, and Diamond with violations of the anti-fraud and registration provisions of the federal securities laws. The complaint seeks permanent injunctions and disgorgement plus interest and penalties. For Zaslavskiy, the SEC also seeks an officer-and-director bar and a bar from participating in any offering of digital securities.

The SEC's investigation, which is continuing, has been conducted by Jorge Tenreiro, Pamela Sawhney and Valerie A. Szczepanik. The case is being supervised by Lara S. Mehraban. The SEC encourages victims of the alleged fraud to contact Ms. Szczepanik at (212) 336-1100.