The FCA’s Chief Economist Division, which Kate will head, provides rigorous economic thinking, research, analysis and advice to help the FCA deliver on its strategic objective of making financial services markets work well, and to assess and demonstrate the impact of FCA interventions on those markets. Kate Collyer, the incoming Chief Economist at the FCA, said 'I am delighted to be joining the FCA to lead their expert and highly regarded economics team. The FCA has an impressive reputation for thought leadership and I am looking forward to leading work to further promote economics and analysis across the FCA.' Christopher Woolard, executive director of Strategy and Competition, said: 'Kate will play a vital role at the FCA, further embedding the use of economic analysis in our decision making and assessing how well the interventions we make are working. Kate’s excellent economic credentials, and her experience of managing diverse teams will be a huge benefit, given the breadth of analysis the FCA undertakes. I look forward to welcoming her.' As well as managing the FCA’s economic research and analysis, the FCA’s Chief Economist jointly heads the wider Competition and Economics Division. As chief economist, Kate will act as an adviser to the FCA’s executive committee and board. Kate will take up the new role in October.

Notes to editors

  1. At BEIS, Kate sets strategic direction and oversees the economic analysis for ministers on energy, climate change and market frameworks, including labour markets, competition, regulation and consumer policy.  In addition, Kate is head of profession, leading all of BEIS’ economists. Kate sits on the board of the Low Carbon Contracts Company and Electricity Settlements Company, which are owned by the Secretary of State for BEIS to deliver the Government’s electricity market reform. Kate was previously Deputy Chief Economic Adviser at the Competition and Markets Authority. Before that, Kate was Director of Economics, Market and Mergers at the CMA. Kate held roles at the Competition Commission and started her career at Lexecon (now CRA Consulting). Kate holds degrees from UCL and LSE.
  2. On 1 April 2013, the FCA became responsible for the conduct supervision of all regulated financial firms and the prudential supervision of those not supervised by the Prudential Regulation Authority (PRA).
  3. The FCA has an overarching strategic objective of ensuring the relevant markets function well. To support this, it has three operational objectives: to secure an appropriate degree of protection for consumers; to protect and enhance the integrity of the UK financial system; and to promote effective competition in the interests of consumers.
  4. Find out more information about the FCA.
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