The paper is a set of essays that discuss what a good culture might look like, the role of regulation and regulators, how firms might go beyond incentives, and how to change behaviour for the better.

Culture and governance is a priority for the FCA and we have a strong focus on the role of the individual as well as the firm. The FCA has considered the role of leaders, incentives and capabilities, and governance of decision making. The introduction of the Senior Managers and Certification Regime (SM&CR) is an example of this; it sets minimum standards for the behaviour of financial services staff and aims to promote a culture where Senior Managers take responsibility for identifying where harm might occur, and take action to prevent it. The SM&CR creates a formal link between the behaviour of individuals and the conduct of the firm.

Jonathan Davidson, FCA Executive Director of Supervision - Retail and Authorisations, said:

“Culture may not be easily measurable but it is manageable. So firms can and should take responsibility for ensuring their culture is healthy for both their employees and customers, which can complement and support their business strategy.

“We as a regulator have long gone beyond having the mindset that simply complying with rules is enough. However we don’t believe a one size fits all culture is the right way to go. So we want to promote a discussion and consensus on the essential features of a healthy culture and how firms, regulators, employees and customers can help deliver that culture.”

The FCA would like all those with an interest in financial services to consider the issues in the paper and to engage in the debate about what constitutes a healthy culture, and how to promote it.

Notes to editors

  1. DP18/2: Transforming culture in financial services
  2. On 1 April 2013, the FCA became responsible for the conduct supervision of all regulated financial firms and the prudential supervision of those not supervised by the Prudential Regulation Authority (PRA).
  3. The FCA has an overarching strategic objective of ensuring the relevant markets function well. To support this it has three operational objectives: to secure an appropriate degree of protection for consumers; to protect and enhance the integrity of the UK financial system; and to promote effective competition in the interests of consumers.
  4. Find out more information about the FCA.

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